Welcome.

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we are looking forward to making more interesting and inspiring music in the future.

Welcome.

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we are looking forward to making more interesting and inspiring music in the future.

Stone Records would like to recommend this new wireless music system. We've had a play with prototypes and talked to the CEO, and this is going to be a really exciting product. You will be able to combine it with a simple home automation system, but more than that, just as a stand-alone sound system it already solves the problems that exist with Sonos. Support it now on Kickstarter to be the first to own it and to get it for a great price.

Musaic Wireless HiFi Music System - Your music, Your way.

Stylish and compact Wi-Fi and Bluetooth hi-fi speakers, controlled by apps for Apple iPhone & iPad, Android phone & tablet, Mac & PC.

Today at 10:59am • No Comments

Today Stone Records released its 40th disc - a wonderful collection of choral works by composer Tim Hamilton, performed by his own chamber choir Cantoribus (with a bit of help from Liz Meister).

Vision :: Stone Records, Independent Classical Music

stonerecords.co.uk

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we a...

Mar 31st 7:19pm • No Comments

Nothing like a spring clean of your code to make your website fire on all cylinders again. Thanks to the guys at Woven Design for your skill,

Stone Records, Independent Classical Music

stonerecords.co.uk

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we a...

Mar 31st 6:59pm • No Comments

Charles Wood


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Charles Wood (1866-1926) was in Vicars’ Hill in the Cathedral precincts of Armagh, Ireland, he was the fifth child and third son of Charles Wood Sr. and Jemima Wood. The boy was a treble chorister in the choir of the nearby St. Patrick’s Cathedral (Church of Ireland). His father sang tenor as a stipendiary ‘Gentleman’ or ‘Lay Vicar Choral’ in the Cathedral choir and was also the Diocesan Registrar of the church. He was a cousin of Irish composer Ina Boyle.

Wood received his early education at the Cathedral Choir School and also studied organ with two Organists and Masters of the Boys of Armagh Cathedral, Robert Turle and his successor Dr Thomas Marks. In 1883 he became one of fifty inaugural class members of the Royal College of Music, studying composition with Charles Villiers Stanford and Charles Hubert Hastings Parry primarily, and horn and piano secondarily. Following four years of training, he continued his studies at Selwyn College, Cambridge through 1889, where he began teaching harmony and counterpoint. In 1889 he attained a teaching position at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, first as organ scholar and then as fellow in 1894, becoming the first Director of Music and Organist. He was instrumental in the reflowering of music at the college, though more as a teacher and organiser of musical events than as composer. After Stanford died, Wood assumed his mentor’s vacant role as University of Cambridge Professor of Music in 1924.

Like his better-known colleague Stanford, Wood is chiefly remembered for his Anglican church music. As well as his Communion Service in the Phrygian Mode, his settings of the Magnificat and Nunc dimittis are still popular with cathedral and parish church choirs, particularly the services in F, D, and G, and the two settings in E flat; during Passiontide his St Mark Passion is sometimes performed, and demonstrates Wood’s interest in modal composition, in contrast to the late romantic harmonic style he more usually employs.

Wood’s anthems with organ, Expectans expectavi, and O Thou, the Central Orb are both frequently performed and recorded; as are his unaccompanied anthems Tis the day of Resurrection, Glory and Honour and, most popular of all, Hail, gladdening light and its lesser-known equivalent for men’s voices, Great Lord of Lords. All Wood’s a cappella music demonstrates fastidious craftsmanship and a supreme mastery of the genre, and he is no less resourceful in his accompanied choral works which sometimes include unison sections and have stirring organ accompaniments, conveying a satisfying warmth and richness of emotional expression appropriate to his carefully chosen texts.

Wood collaborated with priest and poet George Ratcliffe Woodward in the revival and popularisation of renaissance tunes to new English religious texts, notably co-editing three books of carols. He also wrote eight string quartets, and was co-founder (in 1904) of the Irish Folk Song Society.