Welcome.

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we are looking forward to making more interesting and inspiring music in the future.

Welcome.

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we are looking forward to making more interesting and inspiring music in the future.

This looks like a very worthwhile venture.

London English Song Festival

The LESF celebrates & promotes the performance, composition and appreciation of English song through concerts & educational activities.

Apr 23rd 7:12am • No Comments

Stone Records would like to recommend this new wireless music system. We've had a play with prototypes and talked to the CEO, and this is going to be a really exciting product. You will be able to combine it with a simple home automation system, but more than that, just as a stand-alone sound system it already solves the problems that exist with Sonos. Support it now on Kickstarter to be the first to own it and to get it for a great price.

Musaic Wireless HiFi Music System - Your music, Your way.

Stylish and compact Wi-Fi and Bluetooth hi-fi speakers, controlled by apps for Apple iPhone & iPad, Android phone & tablet, Mac & PC.

Apr 17th 10:59am • No Comments

Today Stone Records released its 40th disc - a wonderful collection of choral works by composer Tim Hamilton, performed by his own chamber choir Cantoribus (with a bit of help from Liz Meister).

Vision :: Stone Records, Independent Classical Music

stonerecords.co.uk

Stone Records was formed in 2008 to produce high quality classical CDs with a broad appeal. In a short space of time the label has received critical acclaim for its initial releases and embarked upon a number of ambitious and successful projects. With many further discs already in the pipeline, we a...

Mar 31st 7:19pm • No Comments

Percy Grainger


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Delius and his circle

Percy Grainger (1882-1961) was known during his lifetime as a virtuoso pianist and arranger of popular English folk song. His primary contribution to music, however, lies in his prolific output as a composer of expert and highly original works. Grainger’s early years were spent in Melbourne where he studied first with his mother, and later with Louis Pabst. From 1895-1899 he attended the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt, Germany, and then settled in London in 1901. The next 10 years or so were devoted to a combination of concert touring and folk song collection. Grainger’s early reputation was as a brilliant and eccentric pianist, and it was this talent that not only provided his income for the rest of his life, but also brought him into contact with other composers. Grieg and Delius, in particular, had great influence on Grainger’s development of a sympathy and sensitivity toward unique national and folk styles. In 1914, Grainger moved to New York, beginning a long career as a composer, arranger, collector of folk music, and educator; he became an American citizen in 1918. In 1925 and 1927 he collected and published over 200 Danish folk songs, and returned to Australia in 1924, 1926, and from 1934-1935 in order to establish a Grainger Museum at the University of Melbourne devoted to ethnomusicological research. His final years were spent completing and arranging his earlier works and trying to develop a workable form of his “free music” using primarily theremins, one of the earliest electronic instruments. The project remained incomplete, and Grainger died embittered and in relative obscurity, known only for a handful of light works that he referred to derogatorily as his “fripperies.”

Early in his life, Grainger rejected the central European tradition of Western classical music, seeking instead a “democratic” music that was more closely related to natural sounds, speech, and world music. In his quest to assimilate as much unique musical culture as possible, Grainger became one of the first ethnomusicologists to use the wax cylinder phonograph in the collection and transcription of indigenous music. His arrangements of many of these are among the best ever done, capturing not only the melodies and harmonies, but also the timbres, inflections, and performance styles of each individual piece. In his own compositions, Grainger experimented with nontraditional rhythms, forms, and instrumental combinations in an attempt to create what he called “free music.” He also created a large body of more traditional works and arrangements intended for more popular consumption, motivated, no doubt, by his experience with the Edwardian music hall and later with the U.S. Army Band.